TIMELINE 1960-1970




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TIMELINE 1960-1970

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What happened in the world of Science Fiction between 1960 and 1970? There are 3 hotlinks here to authors, magazines, films, or television items elsewhere in the Ultimate Science Fiction Web Guide or beyond.
Most recently updated: 24 December 2003
Executive Summary of the Decade Major Books of the Decade Major Films/TV of this Decade Other Key Dates and Stories of this Decade Major Writers Born this Decade Major Writers Died this Decade Hotlinks to other Timeline pages of SF Chronology Where to Go for More: 51 Useful Reference Books

Executive Summary of the Decade

This was the decade when human beings first went into space, with tentative suborbital flights in the X-15 and Mercury-Redstone, with a single orbit by Yuri Gagarin in Vostok-1, then longer orbits, the first woman in space (Valentina Tereshkova in 1963), then two astronauts at a time, three at a time, and then ... of course .. to the moon and back with Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins in Apollo 11 (1969). Every science fiction writer and reader got to tell their families and friends "I told you so!" Space was not just for astronauts, of course. The first weather satellite was launched in 1960, the first live transatlantic television by satellite was in 1962 (Telstar), and either one of these applications launched an industry that more than paid for the manned extravaganzas. Both the USA (Mariner 4) and the USSR (Zond 2) launched interplanetary probes in 1964. Both USA and USSR soft-land unmanned spacecraft on the Moon (1966) as part of a Moon Race, which the losing USSR later claims it was never in. Some inventions and innovations of the 1960s that shaped the culture: 1960: Implanted Pacemaker 1961: The Pill goes on the market 1962: TV Satellite (see opening paragraph) 1963: Casette tape, and the first portable music machines 1964: Home kidney dialysis 1965: Packet-switching (basis of the Internet) 1966: First whole-Earth view of weather by satellite 1967: Breathalyzer used on car drivers 1968: Russian T-144 is first supersonic airliner 1969: Moonlanding (see opening paragraph) 1970: Liquid crystal watches go on market The "Baby Boom" (1946-1962) ended, and "Generation X" began (1963-1980?). It was the heyday of the paperback book, which along with television's "Star Trek" and Hollywood films, continued to push science fiction magazines into a lesser space in the imagination. For the first time, science fiction books regularly hit the best-seller list, and the top writers began to receive hundreds of thousands of dollars in advance for their novels. The Nebula Awards begin (1966). Major science fiction and fantasy novels were published by: Brian Aldiss, Kingsley Amis, Poul Anderson, Piers Anthony, J. G. Ballard, James Blish, John Brunner, Algis Budrys, Anthony Burgess, William Burroughs, Hal Clement, Mark Clifton, L. Sprague de Camp, Arthur C. Clarke, D. G. Compton, Avram Davidson, Leslie Purnell Davies, Samuel R. Delany, Philip K. Dick, Gordon Dickson, Thomas M. Disch, G. C. Edmonson, Philip Jose Farmer, Daniel Francis Galouye, James E. Gunn, Harry Harrison, Robert A. Heinlein, Zenna Henderson, Frank Herbert, Hayden Howard, Robert E. Howard, Anna Kavan [Helen Woods Edmonds], Daniel Keyes, R. A. Lafferty, Keith Laumer, Ursula K. Le Guin, Fritz Leiber, Stanislaw Lem, Ira Levin, Anne McCaffrey, Walter M. Miller, Michael Moorcock, Larry Niven, William Francis Nolan & George Clayton Johnson, Alan E. Nourse, Edgar Pangborn, Alexei Panshin, Keith Roberts, Joanna Russ, Robert Silverberg, Clifford D. Simak, Cordwainer Smith, Norman Spinrad, Boris & Arkady Strugatski, Theodore Sturgeon, Walter Tevis, Wilson Tucker, Jack Vance, Kurt Vonnegut Jr., James White, and Roger Zelazny. The psychedelic 1960's love-generation political revolution hippie "drugs, sex, rock & roll" era penetrated science fiction with a movement called "The New Wave", characterized by stylistic experiment, rejection of standards, emphasis on relevance, bold and sometimes obscene language, and altered states of consciousness. This movement reached its high point in Harlan Ellison [as editor] "Dangerous Visions" (Garden City NY: Doubleday), the most important anthology of the decade by far. Novels such as "The Butterfly Kid" by Chester Anderson, with its explicit druggy Greenwich Village ambience, and Norman Spinrad's "Bug Jack Barron" followed where Michael Moorcock as New Wave idiologue led the way. The changes in the scene, more broadly, included: The Berlin Wall being erected in 1961, giving the Cold War a potent new metaphor, John F. Kennedy being assassinated in the United States (1963), Nelson Mandela starting a long prison term in South Africa (1964), Martin Luther King winning a Nobel Peace Prize (1965) and being assassinated (1968), the United States military openly in Vietnam (1965), the Cultural Revolution starting in China (1966), the Six Day War by Israel against its Arab neighbors (1967), Students rioting in Paris and the caollege campuses of America (1968), Prague Spring stomped flat by Soviet tanks in Czechoslovakia (1968), the Hippie apotheosis in Woodstock and horror in the Charlie Manson murders (1969). . Yet at the same time, there was a backlash of traditional "hard SF" novels led by former Caltech student Larry Niven. Niven entered the ranks of Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Hal Clement, and Robert Heinlein with such startling feats of visionary hyper-engineering as "Ringworld" (1970). Gregory Benford was also in this vein, and Poul Anderson's "Tau Zero" relentlessly applied Einstein to cosmic storytelling. In the world of magazines included "Astounding Science Fiction" being transformed into "Analog" (1960), Frederik Pohl taking the helm of "Galaxy" and "If" (1961), "Quarber Mercur" being launched in Austria (1963), "Amazing Stories" and "Fantastic" are sold to a new publisher who ends the editorship of Cele Goldsmith (1965), the bookazine anthology "Orbit" is launched by Damon Knight (1966), The French science fiction magazine "Horizons du Fantastique" is launched (1967), the Spanish magazine "Neuva Dimension" and the American journal "Locus" start production (1968), and the British/Australian magazine "Vision of Tomorrow" is the first to publish a story by Polish titan Stanislaw Lem (1969). Outstanding short fiction appeared from a wide range of authors, including: Vance Aandahl, Brian Aldiss, Dick Allen, Kingsley Amis, Poul Anderson, Piers Anthony, Christopher Anvil, Paul Ash, Isaac Asimov, Arnold M. Auerbach, Hillary Bailey, Russell Baker, J. G. Ballard, George Bamber, Neil Barrett Jr., Donald Barthelme, Charles Beaumont, Stephen Becker, Gregory Benford, Alfred Bester, Alistair Bevan, Lloyd Biggle, James Blish, J. F. Bone, Jorge Luis Borges, Ben Bova, Ray Bradbury, Jonathan Brand, Frederic Brown, Rosel George Brown, Reginald Bretnor, John Brunner, Art Buchwald, David R. Bunch, Edgar Rice Burroughs, William Burroughs, Johnny Byrne, Hortense Calisher, Holley Cantine, Terry Carr, Hap Carwood, A. Bertram Chandler, Arthur C. Clarke, Hal Clement, Brian Cleve, Mark Clifton, D. G. Compton, Michael Coney, Betsy Curtis, Roald Dahl, Allen Danzig, Avram Davidson, Samuel Delany, Philip K. Dick, Gordon Dickson, Thomas M. Disch, Sonya Dorman, Gardner Dozois, Lawrence Durrell, Sheri S. Eberhart, Larry Eisenberg, Gordon Eklund, George P. Elliott, Harlan Ellison, Elizabeth Emmett, Carol Emshwiller, Philip Jose Farmer, James T. Farrell, Howard Fast, Burt Filer, Jack Finney, R. C. Fitzpatrick, Colin Free, Romain Gary, Jose Maria Gironella, Alice Glaser, Stephen Goldin, W. J. J. Gordon, Ron Goulart, Joseph Green, Robert M. Green Jr., Julian F. Grow, John Haase, Robert B. Hale, Donald Hall, Charles L. Harness, Harry Harrison, Karen Henderson, Zenna Henderson, Thomas Herzog, H. B. Hickey, H. H. Hollis, James D. Houston, Hayden Howard, Fred Hoyle, Kaatje Hurlbut, Harvey Jacobs, Alfred Jarry, Frank A. Javor, Gary Jenning, Edward Jesby, Gerald Jonas, Raymond F. Jones, A. K. Jorgensson, Norman Kagan, Colin Kapp, Michael Karageorge, Morgan Kent, Gerald Kersh, Marshall King, Alex Kirs, Damon Knight, Norman Knight, Dean R. Koontz, Bob Kurosaka, R. A. Lafferty, Tommaso Landolfi, Keith Laumer, Jack B. Lawson, Ursula K. Le Guin, Fritz Leiber, Myron L. Lewis, Robert Lory, C. C. MacApp, George MacBeth, John D. MacDonald, Edward Mackin, Katherine MacLean, Bernard Malamud, Alexander B. Malec, David I. Masson, Andre Maurois, Bruce McAllister, Anne McCaffrey, E. Clayton McCarty, Richard McKenna, Dean McLaughlin, Henri Michaux, Michael Moorcock, Ward Moore, Walter Moudy, Harry Mulisch, Ray Nelson, Joseph Nesvadba, Kris Neville, Larry Niven, William F. Nolan, Andre Norton, Alan E. Nourse, K. M. O'Donnell, Andrew J. Offutt, Bob Ottum Jr., Cliff Owsley, R. C. Phelan, Diana Plachta, Frederik Pohl & C. M. Kornbluth, Arthur Porges, Tom Purdom, Rick Raphael, Peter Redgrove, Kit Reed, Mack Reynolds, Walt & Leigh Richmond, Frank Roberts, Keith Roberts, Frank M. Robinson, Robert Rohrer, David Rome, Joanna Russ, Bertrand Russell, Ray Russell, Fred Saberhagen, James Sallis, William Sambrot, Josephine Saxton, James H. Schmitz, James Schutz, Arthur Sellings, C. C. Shackleton, Jack Sharkey, Bob Shaw, Robert Sheckley, Clifford Simak, Isaac Bashevis Singer, John T. Sladek, Henry Slesar, Cordwainer Smith, Philip H. Smith, Norman Spinrad, Theodore Sturgeon, Thomas Burnett Swann, Leo Szilard, Peter Tate, William F. Temple, William Tenn, Gilbert Thomas, Theodore Thomas, James Thurber, Robert Tilley, James Tiptree Jr., Robert D. Tschirigi, E. C. Tubb, John Updike, Sydney J. Van Scyoc, A. E. Van Vogt, Jack Vance, Vernor Vinge, Kurt Vonnegut, E. G. Von Wald, A. A. Walde, Robert Wallace, Edward Wellen, James White, M. E. White, Joseph Whitehill, George Whitley, Kate Wilhelm, Richard Wilson, Bernard Wolfe, Gene Wolfe, Gray Wright, John Wyndham, Laurence Yep, Albert F. Young, Robert F. Young, and the astonishing Roger Zelazny. Movies of the 1960s ranged from respectful treatments of the classics such as "The Time Machine" (1960) and "From the Earth to the Moon" (1964), both from H. G. Wells novels; to clear-eyed adaptations of contemporary science fiction novels such as "The Day of the Triffids" (1963), "Farenheit 451" (1966) from the Ray Bradbury novel, Planet of the Apes (1968) from the Pierre Boulle novel, and The Andromeda Strain (1970) from the novel by Michael Crichton. Similarly, "Charly" (1968) from the Daniel Keyes short story (later expanded) "Flowers for Algernon", was genuinely science fiction (it could not have unfolded without a specific biomedical invention) and was a popular Oscar-winner starring Cliff Robertson, without having to provide eye-candy special effects, robots, aliens, spaceships, or the other paraphrenalia which Hollywood producers mistake for the SF attitude of logical extrapolation. This latter group of serious contemporary films based on the works of science fiction authors with respectable print reputations culminated in the unsurpassed "2001: A Space Odyssey" (1968), Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrik's magnificent collaboration which most critics of the time failed to comprehend. At the same time, films were made with an ironic, satiric, or self-referential edge not typical of earlier times, such as "Barbarella" (1967) with Jane Fonda as the sexy comic book heroine, "The Tenth Victim" (1965) from a novel "The Ninth Victim" by Robert Sheckley. "Seconds" (1966) gives a wicked but plausible sting to the notion that one can, for a price, start over in a new body. Truffaut made a moody masterpiece with "Alphaville" (1965), a film that could not have been conceived in the schlocky sci-fi era of the 1940s and 1950s. This irony and satire peaked, perhaps, in the very dark comedy of global nuclear war "Dr. Strangelove" (1964). Television in the 1960s was crowned, in retrospect, by the low-budget high-concept "Star Trek." "Star Trek" soon outpaced the previous king of the hill -- "The Twilight Zone" (1961) -- with notable episodes such as "Menagerie" (1966) and "City on the Edge of Forever" (1967), the great episode scripted by Harlan Ellison, then allegedly botched by the producer. A 1997 book entirely deals with the tangled tale of this single episode. I have information on, and hotlinks to, some 35 Science Fiction Television series of the 1960s which is 5 more than in the decade of the 1950s. The science fiction media boom was obvious to everyone, except the TV network executives, who still saw it as part of the low-budget juvenile heritage of the 1940s and 1950s. Were they in for a surprise... Meanwhile, in Great Britain, a low-budget kid's show called "Doctor Who" began (1963) and soon attracted a cult audience, and then wider popularity. Similarly "The Prisoner" starts small in Great Britain (1967), gains audiences in America, but is too intelligent for a true mass audience success. 1960: U.S. Scientists, Time Magazine's Person of the Year [that's pretty science fictional: scientists on cover of top magazine] 1961: John F. Kennedy, Time Magazine's Person of the Year 1962: Pope John XXIII, Time Magazine's Person of the Year 1963: Martin Luther King, Jr., Time Magazine's Person of the Year 1964: Lyndon B. Johnson, Time Magazine's Person of the Year 1965: General William Westmoreland, Time Magazine's Person of the Year 1966: Twenty-five and Under, Time Magazine's Person of the Year 1967: Lyndon B. Johnson, Time Magazine's Person of the Year 1968: Astronauts William Ander, Frank Borman, and James Lovell, Time Magazine's Person of the Year [they orbited the moon] 1969: The Middle Americans, Time Magazine's Person of the Year 1970: Willy Brandt, Time Magazine's Person of the Year Return to Top of 1960s Timeline page

Major Books of the Decade

1960 Brian Aldiss: "Galaxies Like Grains of Sand" (New York: New American Library) 1960 Poul Anderson: "The High Crusade" Nominee for 1960 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1960 Algis Budrys: "Rogue Moon" (Greenwich CT: Fawcett) Nominee for 1960 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1960 Mark Clifton: "Eight Keys to Eden" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) 1960 L. Sprague de Camp: "The Glory That Was" (New York: Avalon) 1960 Gordon Dickson: "Dorsai" 1960 Philip Jose Farmer: "Strange Relations" (New York: Ballentine) 1960 Harry Harrison: "Deathworld" (New York: Bantam) Nominee for 1960 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1960 Walter M. Miller: "A Canticle for Leibowitz" (Philadelphia: Lippincott) Hugo Award, required reading in many college courses, an absolute classic not to be missed. Winner of 1960 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1960 Robert P. Mills [editor]: "The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction, Ninth Series" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) 1960 Theodore Sturgeon: "Venus Plus X" (New York: Pyramid Books) Nominee for 1960 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1961 Kingsley Amis & Robert Conquest [editor]: "Spectrum" (London: Gollancz) 1961 Arthur C. Clarke: "A Fall of Moondust" (New York: Harcourt Brace & World) Nominee for 1962 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1961 Daniel Francis Galouye: "Dark Universe" (New York: Bantam) Nominee for 1961 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1961 James E. Gunn: "The Joy Makers" (New York: Bantam) 1961 Harry Harrison: "The Stainless Steel Rat" (New York: Pyramid Books) 1961 Harry Harrison: "Sense of Obligation" Nominee for 1961 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1961 Robert A. Heinlein: "Stranger in a Strange Land" (New York: Putnam) Winner of 1961 Hugo Award for Best Novel. Michael Valentine Smith is born and brought up on Mars, and brings Martian culture to Earth, which includes "Grokking", communal living, ritual cannibalism, and unfortunately became a bible to madman Charles Manson and his murderous gang. Robert Heinlein became a cult success among teenagers, who failed to follow his philsophy as expressed in other novels of Heinlein's. 1961 Zenna Henderson: "Pilgrimmage: The Book of the People" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) 1961 Stanislaw Lem: "Solaris" (Poland: Panstwowe Wydawnictwo) Intelligent extraterrestrial ocean is metaphysically beyond the attempts of humans to fathom in this enigmatic novel, made into a superior Russian film {hotlink to be done} 1961 Alan E. Nourse: "Tiger by the Tail and Other Science Fiction Stories" (New York: McKay) 1961 Clifford Simak: "The Fisherman" Nominee for 1961 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1961 Theodore Sturgeon: "Some of Your Blood" (New York: Ballentine) 1961 James White: "Second Ending" Nominee for 1961 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1962 xxxx: "The Manchrian Candidate" {to be done} 1962 Brian W. Aldiss: "The Long Afternoon of Earth" (New York: New American Library) 1962 J. G. Ballard: "The Drowned World" (New York: Berkley) surrealistic masterpiece about alienated protagonist undergoing metaphysical transformation in the face of global catastrophe (first of pseudo-trilogy including 1964: "The Burning World", and 1966: "The Crystal World") 1962 Marion Zimmer Bradley: "Sword of Aldones" Nominee for 1962 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1962 Anthony Burgess: "A Clockwork Orange" (London: heinemann) {film hotlink to be done} 1962 Philip K. Dick: "The Man in the High Castle" (New York: Putnam) Arguably the greatest alternate history ("parahistory) novel. Here, the Germans and Japanese occupy a balkanized America, having won World War II. In a book-within-the-book, a novelist writes about an alternate world where America had won World War II. This Hugo Award-winner was written with the aid of chance or synchronicity (with Dick casting the "I Ching") and it has a nuanced view of Eastern and Western cultures. A disturbing and yet strangely uplifting masterpiece. 1962 H. Beam Piper: "Little Fuzzy" Nominee for 1962 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1962 "Vercors": "Sylva" Nominee for 1962 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1963 Pierre Boule: "La Planete des Singes" (later translated as "The Planet of the Apes") 1963 John Brunner: "Castaways' World" (New York: Ace) 1963 Robert A. Heinlein: "Glory Road" Nominee for 1963 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1963 Robert A. Heinlein: "Orphans of the Sky" (London: Gollancz) concludes the "Future History" series 1963 Frank Herbert: "Dune World" Nominee for 1963 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1963 Andre Norton: "Witch World" Nominee for 1963 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1963 Clifford D. Simak: "Here Gather the Stars" Winner of 1963 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1963 Clifford D. Simak: "Way Station" 1963 Cordwainer Smith: "You Will Never Be The Same" (Evanston IL: Regency) 8 stories from the "Instrumentality of mankind" series 1963 Walter Tevis: "The Man Who Fell to Earth" (Greenwich CT: Fawcett) {film hotlink to be done} 1963 Jack Vance: "The Dragon Masters" (New York: Ace) 1963 Kurt Vonnegut Jr.: "Cat's Cradle" (New York: Holt Rinehart & Winston) Nominee for 1963 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1963 James White: "Star Surgeon" (New York: ballentine) 1964 Poul Anderson: "Trader to the Stars" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) 1964 J. G. Ballard: "The Burning World" (New York: Berkley) surrealistic masterpiece about alienated protagonist undergoing metaphysical transformation in the face of global catastrophe (2nd of pseudo-trilogy including 1962: "The Drowned World", and 1966: "The Crystal World") 1964 James Blish: "The Issue at Hand" (SF Criticism, under pseudonym William Atheling) 1964 John Brunner: "The Whole Man" Nominee for 1964 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1964 Hal Clement: "Close to Critical" (New York: Ballentine) Sequel to "Mission of Gravity" (1954) 1964 Robert E. Howard: "Almuric" (New York: Ace) posthumous publication of "Weird Tales" serial (1939) 1964 Fritz Leiber: "The Wanderer" (New York: Ballentine) 1964 Hugo Award Winner for Best Novel 1964 Edgar Pangborn: "Davy" (New York: St.Martin) Nominee for 1964 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1964 Cordwainer Smith: "The Planet Buyer" Nominee for 1964 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1965 Brian W. Aldiss: "Best Science Fiction of Brian Aldiss" (London: Faber & Faber) 1965 Poul Anderson: "The Star Fox" Nebula finalist 1965 John Brunner: "The Squares of the City" (New York: Ballentine) War and peace, human rights, dictatorship, politics, and all based on an actual chess game! Nominee for 1965 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1965 William Burroughs: "Nova Express", Hallucinatory, disjointed Nebula finalist in which junkies and aliens blur together 1965 Avram Davidson: "Rogue Dragon" erudite Nebula finalist 1965 Philip K. Dick: "Dr. Bloodmoney" Nebula finalist 1965 Philip K. Dick: "The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) One of Dick's dream-logic masterpieces, in which drigs change the world rather than individual consciousness. Nebula finalist 1965 Thomas M. Disch: "The Genocides" Nebula finalist 1965 G. C. Edmonson: "The Ship that Sailed the Time Stream" Nebula finalist 1965 Frank Herbert: "Dune" (Philadelphia: Chilton) {film hotlink to be done} The breaktrhough od Space Opera into major Literature. Winner of the first Nebula Award for Best Novel Tied as Winner of 1965 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1965 Keith Laumer: "A Plague of Demons" Nebula finalist 1965 Sam Moskowitz [editor]: "Modern Masterpieces of Science Fiction" (Cleveland: World) 1965 Clifford D. Simak: "All Flesh is Grass" Nebula finalist 1965 E. E. Smith: "Skylark DuQuesne" Nominee for 1965 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1965 Theodore L. Thomas & Kate Wilhelm: "The Clone" Nebula finalist 1965 James White: "Escape Orbit" Nebula finalist 1965 Roger Zelazny: "...And Call Me Conrad" Tied as Winner of 1965 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1966 J. G. Ballard: "The Crystal World" (London: Cape; New York: Berkley) surrealistic masterpiece about alienated protagonist undergoing metaphysical transformation in the face of global catastrophe (3rd of pseudo-trilogy including 1962: "The Drowned World", and 1964: "The Burning World") 1966 Samuel R. Delany: "Babel-17" Amazing action-adventure space story based on linguistics. Delany was a teenager when he wrote this scintillating tale. Nebula Award (tied for 1st place) Nominee for 1966 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1966 Harlan Ellison (ed.): "Dangerous Visions" The most influential "New Wave" anthology 1966 Randall Garrett: "Too Many Magicians" Murder mystery in a world where magic works, in a manner as logical as science is for us. Nominee for 1966 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1966 Robert A. Heinlein: "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" Nebula finalist Nominee for 1965 Hugo Award for Best Novel. Winner of 1966 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1966 Daniel Keyes: "Flowers for Algernon" (New York: Harcourt, Brace and World) Nebula Award (tied for 1st place) adaped to film "Charlie" {hotlink to be done} Nominee for 1966 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1966 Ursula K. Le Guin: "Planet of Exile" (New York: Ace) 1966 Ursula K. Le Guin: "Rocannon's World" (New York: Ace) 1966 James H. Schmitz: "The Witches of Karres" Nominee for 1966 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1966 Thomas Burnett Swann: "Day of the Minotaur" [fantasy] Nominee for 1966 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1966 James White: "The Watch Below" (New York: Ballentine) 1966 Roger Zelazny: "This Immortal" (New York: Ace) The Earth may be attacked by aliens, crushed by catastrophe, srawrming with mutants, but that is merely the canvas for an optimistic tale of benign immortals 1967 Chester Anderson: "The Butterfly Kid" Hippies save Greenwich Village -- and the world. Nominee for 1967 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1967 Piers Anthony: "Chthon" Nebula finalist. Nominee for 1967 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1967 John Brunner: "Quicksand" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) 1967 Samuel Delany, Jr.: "The Einstein Intersection" (New York: Ace) Nebula finalist. Nominee for 1967 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1967 Harlan Ellison [editor]: "Dangerous Visions" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) The most important anthology of the decade by far 1967 Hayden Howard: "The Eskimo Invasion" Nebula finalist 1967 Anna Kavan [Helen Woods Edmonds]: "Ice" (London: Owens) 1967 William Francis Nolan & George Clayton Johnson: "Logan's Run" (New York: Dial) {film & TV hotlinks to be done} 1967 Robert Silverberg: "Thorns" Nebula finalist. Nominee for 1967 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1967 Roger Zelazny: "Four for Tomorrow" (New York: Ace) 1967 Roger Zelazny: "Lord of Light" (New York: Doubleday) Hindu and Buddhist mythology transformed gloriously into science fiction. Nebula finalist. Winner of 1967 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1968 James Blish: "Black Easter" Nebula finalist (ranked #5) Theological horror 1968 John Brunner: "Stand on Zanzibar" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) Best overpopulation/ecological crisis novel ever published, which also predicted the Internet and computer viruses... Sheer genius, very scary, and very funny at the same time. Nebula finalist (ranked #3). Winner of 1968 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1968 Leslie Purnell Davies: "The Alien" (London: Jenkins) 1968 Samuel Delany, Jr.: "Nova" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) Nominee for 1968 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1968 Philip K. Dick: "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" Nebula finalist (tied for 6th place) adapted to film "Bladerunner" {hotlink to be done} 1968 Thomas M. Disch: "Camp Concentration" (London: Rupert Hart Davis) Secret military project injects prisoners with mutant syphilis, and they become supergeniuses intent on a transformational escape. Great wit and irony. 1968 R. A. Lafferty: "Past Master" (New York: Ace) Nebula finalist (tied for #6). Nominee for 1968 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1968 Alexei Panshin: "Rite of Passage" (New York: Ace) Teenagers on Heinleinian generation starship are required to travel on a colonized planet in order to be transformed into adults. Won the 4th annual Nebula Award for Best Novel. Nominee for 1968 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1968 Keith Roberts: "Pavane" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) Another contender for the greatest Alternate History novel: the Spanish Armada defeated England, and the Roman Catholic Church has strangled technological development 1968 Joanna Russ: "Picnic on Paradise" (New York: Ace) Nebula finalist (ranked #4) 1968 Clifford Simak: "Goblin Reservation" Nominee for 1968 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1968 Robert Silverberg: "The Masks of Time" Nebula finalist (ranked #2) 1968 Boris & Arkady Strugatski (anonymous editors): "The Molecular Cafe" groundbreaking Soviet SF anthology for Western distribution 1969 Piers Anthony: "Macroscope" To your humble webmaster, this was Piers Anthony's greatest work of science fiction. It presumes with a straight face that Astrology is true, in the sense that there are twelve zodaical zones in the galaxy that affect human life, and pursues this notion with gosh-wow pseudo-hard-SF imagination involving astronomy and evolutionary biology, with transcendent zeal. Nominee for 1969 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1969 John Brunner: "The Jagged Orbit" Nominee for 1969 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1969 Harry Harrison: "Captive Universe" (New York: Putnam) Generation-ship novel in the great tradition. 1969 Ursula K. Le Guin: "The Left Hand of Darkness" (New York: Ace; Walker) Human colonists on the world Winter have mutated or been genetically engineered into hermaphrodites who change sex when powerfully aroused. This profound study of gender and society is seen through the eyes of a terrestrial human, who is seen on Winter as a freak for not being able to change from male to female. Very controversial novel. Winner of 5th Annual Nebula Award for Best Novel. Winner of 1969 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1969 Anne McCaffrey: "The Ship Who Sang" (New York: Walker) 1969 Michael Moorcock: "The Ice Schooner" (London: Sphere) 1969 Robert Silverberg: "To Live Again" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) 1969 Robert Silverberg: "Up the Line" Nebula finalist, bawdy time travel analysis of the paradox that if time travel tourism is possible, why aren't there vast crowds at every historical event? Makes original suggestion that people would find incest with their remote ancestors to be very appealing. Nominee for 1969 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1969 Norman Spinrad: "Bug Jack Barron" Controversial novel about a future television show journalist who engages celebreties and callers with tough questions, very much in the way that TV today has blurred the boundaries between news and entertainment. He has a moral crisis when the scandal he's probing might buy him off with immortality. Nebula finalist (ranked #3). Nominee for 1969 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1969 Kurt Vonnegut Jr.: "Slaughterhouse Five" (New York: Delacorte Press) Based on autobiographical experience of the firebombibg of Dresden, Vonnegut creates a wry satire of science fiction which is itself good science fiction, with the 4-dimensional Tralfamadoreans bringing protagonist Billy Pilgrim into their perception of space and time. {film hotlink to be done} Nebula finalist (ranked #2) Nominee for 1969 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1969 Roger Zelazny: "Damnation Alley" (New York: Putnam) 1969 Roger Zelazny: "Isle of the Dead" (New York: Ace) Nebula finalist. Nominee for 1969 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1970 Poul Anderson: "Tau Zero" (Garden City NY: Doubleday) The greatest novel based on Einstein's Theory of Relativity and a modern conception of cosmology. Finalist for 1970 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1970 Terry Carr [editor]: "New Worlds of Fantasy, No.2" (New York: Ace) anthology combining fantasy, science fiction, and horror 1970 Lin Carter [editor]: "The Magic of Atlantis" (New York: Lancer) thematic anthology of fantasy 1970 Hal Clement: "Star Light" Finalist for 1970 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1970 D. G. Compton: "The Steel Crocodile" Nebula finalist (ranked #6). 1970 L. Sprague de Camp [editor]: "Warlocks and Warriors" (New York: Putnam) Good anthology of heroic fantasy 1970 Robert A. Heinlein: "I Will Fear No Evil" (New York: Putnam) 1970 R. A. Lafferty: "Fourth Mansions" Nebula finalist (ranked #5). 1970 Staislaw Lem: "Solaris" (London: Faber & Faber) {film hotlink to be done} 1970 Ira Levin: "This Perfect Day" (New York: Random House) Cyberdystopia 1970 Larry Niven: "Ringworld" Won the 6th annual Nebula Award Winner of 1970 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1970 Joanna Russ: "And Chaos Died" tied for 2nd as Nebula finalist 1970 Robert Silverberg: "Tower of Glass" (New York: Scribners) tied for 2nd as Nebula finalist. Finalist for 1970 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1970 Robert Silverberg: "Downward to the Earth" Nebula finalist 1970 Robert Silverberg [editor]: "The Mirror of Infinity: A Critic's Anthology of Science Fiction" (New York: Harper & Row) 1970 Robert Silverberg [editor]: "Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Vol. I" Garden City NY: Doubleday) 1970 Wilson Tucker: "The Year of the Quiet Sun" Nebula finalist (ranked #4). Finalist for 1970 Hugo Award for Best Novel. 1970 Roger Zelazny: "Nine Princes of Amber" [Fantasy] Return to Top of 1960s Timeline page

Major Films/Television this Decade

see also Science Fiction Television of the 1960s 1960 The Angry Red Planet 1960 The Time Machine from the H. G. Wells novel 1960 Village of the Damned 1960 X--the Man with the X-Ray Eyes 1961 The Twilight Zone [TV] 1963 The Day of the Triffids 1964 From the Earth to the Moon from the H. G. Wells novel 1964 Dr. Strangelove 1965 The Tenth Victim from a novel "The Ninth Victim" by Robert Sheckley 1965 Alphaville 1965 Doctor Who and the Daleks [British TV] 1966 Farenheit 451 from the Ray Bradbury novel 1966 Seconds 1966 "Menagerie" [Star Trek] 1967 "City on the Edge of Forever" [TV: Star Trek] the great episode scripted by Harlan Ellison, then botched by the producer 1967 Barbarella 1968 Planet of the Apes from the Pierre Boulle novel 1968 2001: A Space Odyssey Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrik's collaboration 1968 Charly from the Daniel Keyes short story "Flowers for Algernon", Oscar-winner 1969 {to be done} 1970 The Andromeda Strain from the novel by Michael Crichton 1970 Colossus: The Forbin Project Reviews of 1960's SF Movies The list above concentrates on Science Fiction as such. For another perspective, see: The Best Horror Films of the Sixties page of Losman's Lair of Horror Return to Top of 1960s Timeline page

Major Writers Born this Decade

1960 Dafydd ab Hugh 1960 Eva Adams (Artist, Belorussia then London) 1960 Juan Miguel Aguilera (Spain) 1960 Lucy Cullyford Babbitt 1960 John Gregory Betancourt 1960 Steven R. Boyett 1960 Eric Brown 1960 Mark Chadbourne (Dark Fantasy) 1960 Roma Downey (Actress: "Touched by an Angel") 1960 Bob Eggleton (13 Sep 1960) Artist 1960 Paul R. Fisher 1960 Neil Gaiman (UK) 1960 Peter F. Hamilton (UK) 1960 Bruce F. Horton (Artist) 1960 Marc Laidlaw 1960 Margo Lanagan (Australia) 1960 Holly Lisle 1960 Ian McDonald 1960 Ian Rankin (Scotland, Mystery) 1960 Gianni Romano (Italy, wrote thesis on American Science Fiction) 1960 Robert J. Sawyer 1960 Melissa Scott 1960 Julie Dean Smith 1960 Neal Stephenson (or 1959?) 1960 Brad Templeton 1960 Scott D. Yost 1961 Tom Arden 1961 Neal Asher 1961 Klaus Brandt (Artist, Germany) 1961 Christiane Dellbrugge (Artist) 1961 Greg Egan (Australia) 1961 Tara K. Harper 1961 Tom Holt 1961 Moses Isegawa (Uganda) 1961 Evgenii Iufit (Russia) 1961 Helen McKerral 1961 Yun Dae Nyeong (Korea) 1961 Melissa Scott 1961 J. Seijdel (Writer/Critic, Netherland) 1961 Tomasz Setowski (Artist, Poland) 1961 Phillip Teich 1961 Simon Wells (Great-grandson of H. G. Wells, directed "The Time Machine") 1962: Last Year of the "Baby Boom" (1946-1962) 1962 Kevin J. Anderson 1962 David Arnold (Composer: Stargate) 1962 Jonathon Earl Bowser (Artist, Canada) 1962 Greg Capullo (Artist) 1962 Peri Charlifu 1962 Da Chen (China) 1962 David Ficnher (Filmmaker) 1962 Miroslav Gabor (Czech Republic) 1962 Patrick Gale (UK) 1962 Terry McGarry 1962 Frank Bruun Madsen (Artist) 1962 Victor Pelevin (Russia) 1962 Laura Resnick 1962 Jane Routley (Australia) 1962 Karl Schroeder (Canada) 1962 Matthew Waterhouse (Actor, UK) 1963: First Year of "Generation X" 1963 John Christopher Adams 1963 John Gregory Betancourt 1963 Louis Buss (UK) 1963 Andreas Dobler (Artist, Switzerland) 1963 Glenda C. Finkelstein 1963 Laurel K. Hamilton (Laurel Kaye Hamilton) 1963 Sue Isle 1963 Simon Jones 1963 Paul Kidd 1963 Volker Lewandowsky (Artist, Germany) 1963 Joep van Lieshout (Artist, Germany) 1963 Franz Miklis (Artist, Austria) 1963 Garth Nix (Australia) 1963 Lawrence Norfolk 1963 Nicholas Royle 1963 Michelle Sagara 1963 Peter Snejbjerg Nielsen (Artist, Denmark) 1963 Eolake Stobblehouse (Denmark) 1963 Herve Thibon (Artist, France) 1963 Terry Lloyd Vinson 1964 Joshua Bilmes (22 Sep 1964) Literary Agent 1964 Andrew Harman 1964 Jonathan Lethem 1964 more {to be done} 1965 Kevin Standlee (27 Aug 1965) 1965 more {to be done} 1966 Michael Carroll 1966 Sarah Zettel 1966 more {to be done} 1967 Stephen Baxter 1967 Poppy Z. Brite 1967 Paul Kearney 1967 Cecilia Tan 1967 more {to be done} 1968 Tricia Sullivan 1968 more {to be done} 1969 {to be done} 1970 Toren Atkinson (Artist/Film-maker) 1970 Amy K. Brown (Artist) 1970 Ethan Hawke (Actor) 1970 David Hearne 1970 Kathy High (Media Artist) 1970 Martin Livings (Australia) 1970 David Mitchell (UK) 1970 Dermot Ryan (Ireland, author/botanist) 1970 Tom Williams (Australia) 1970 Gordon Michel Woolvett (Canada) For more on individual writers: AUTHORS: annotated list of 3,274 links, last updated 23 Sep 2000; also some brief notes on 6,107 authors and pseudonyms NOT on the Internet, last updated 4 May 2000, for a total of 9,381 authors' hotlinks or names or pseudonyms or notes. Return to Top of 1960s Timeline page

Major Writers Died this Decade

1960 Eric Temple Bell, age 87? 1960 Albert Camus 1960 Victor Rousseau Emanuel, age 81 1960 Boris Pasternak 1960 Danton Walker, age 61 1961 Sir Henry Howart Bashford, age 81 1961 Dashiell Hammett, age 67 1961 Norvell W. Page, age 58 1962 Pierre Benoit, age 76 1962 Sir Charles Galton Darwin, age 75 1962 Howard Roger Garis, age 89, wrote 1st 35 "Tom Swift" books 1962 Michel de Ghelderode, age 64 1963 Kay Burdekin (pseudonym of Katharine Penelope Cade), age 67 1963 Mark Clifton, age 57 1963 Thomas S. Gardner, age 55 1963 Oliver La Farge, age 62 1963 Victor McClure, age 76 1963 Frank R. Paul, age 79, artist 1963 Julius Unger, age 52 1964 Ian Fleming, age 56 1964 Richard McKenna, age 51 1964 Jean Ray (pseudonym of Raymond DeKremer), age 75, Belgium 1965 Shirley Barker, age 54 1965 Sydney Fowler, age 91, wrote as S. Fowler Wright 1965 Shirley Jackson, age 46 1965 Elliott O'Donnell, age 83 1965 H. R. Wakefield, age 77 1966 Basil Davenport, age 61 1966 Brian O'Nolan, age 55 1966 Mrs. Violet Van Der Elst, age 84 1967 Charles Beaumont, long wasting illness, age 38 1967 Basil Rathbone, age 75, actor/author 1968 Helen Edmonds, age 67 1968 George Gamow, age 64 1968 Gerald Kersh 1968 Bernard Newman, age 71 1968 Edwin O'Connor, age 50 1968 Mervyn Peake, age 57 1969 Alexandra David-Nell, age 101 1969 Seabury Quinn, age 80 1970 Brigadier Nigel Balchin, age 62 1970 Erle Stanley Gardner, age 81 1970 Guy Endore, age 70 1970 Graham McInnes, age 58 1970 Sir Compton McKenzie, age 87 more {to be done} Return to Top of 1960s Timeline page

Other Key Dates and Stories of this Decade

1960 "Astounding" gradually changes its name to "Analog" 1960 The science fiction magazine field in America continues to implode, down from 13 titles and 131 issues in 1959 to 9 titles with 67 issues in 1960 (Lester del Rey's count) 1960 The Columbia magazine chain ("Future", "Science Fiction", "Original Science Fiction") collapses and dies Jan 1960 Harry Harrison's serial "Deathworld" begins in "Astounding" 1960: Pittcon, the Eighteenth World Science Fiction Convention, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, (Penn-Sheraton Hotel), Chaired by Dirce Archer, James Blish as Guest of Honor, 568 members attending. The Hugo Awards and Nominations included: Best SF Short Fiction Poul Anderson's short story "The Longest Voyage" (winner) Pauline Ashwell's short story "The Lost Kafoozalum" (Analog) (Richard Lupoff contends that this should have won the Hugo Award for best short story) Theodore Sturgeon's short story "Need" Philip Jose Farmer's short story "Open to Me, My Sister" July 1960 Poul Anderson's wonderful serial "High Crusade" begins in "Analog" Dec 1960 Algis Budrys' short novel "Rogue Moon" in "F&SF" later expanded for book publication Other major short fiction of the year: 1960 Brian Aldiss' short story "Old Hundredth" 1960 Kingsley Amis' short story "Hemingway in Space" 1960 Christopher Anvil's short story "A Rose by Other Name" 1960 Frederic Brown's short story "Abominable" 1960 Rosel George Brown's short story "David's Daddy" 1960 Reginald Bretnor's short story "The man on Top" 1960 John Brunner's short story "Report on the Nature of the Lunar Surface" 1960 Holley Cantine's short story "Double, Double, Toil and Trouble" 1960 Arthur C. Clarke's short story "I Remember Babylon" 1960 Elizabeth Emmett's short story "Enchantment" 1960 Howard Fast's short story "The Large Ant" 1960 Zenna Henderson's short story "Something Bright" 1960 Marshall King's short story "Beach Scene" 1960 Richard McKenna's short story "Mine Own Ways" 1960 Dean McLaughlin's short story "The Brotherhood of Keepers" 1960 Ward Moore's short story "The Fellow Who Married the Maxill Girl" 1960 R. C. Phelan's short story "Something Invented Me" 1960 William Sambrot's short story "Creature of the Snows" 1960 Henry Slesar's short story "Chief" 1960 Joseph Whitehill's short story "In the House, Another" 1960 Bernard Wolfe's short story "The Never Ending Penny" {the above 21 stories appear in Judith Merrill [editor] "Year's best SF: Sixth Annual Edition"}
1961 Horace L. Gold, because of illness, retires as Editor of "Galaxy" and is replaced by Frederik Pohl, who also edits "If" and some other magazines under Guinn Publishing Company 1961 The American science fiction magazine implosion becomes complete, leaving only 6 titles and 60 total issues for the entire year 1961 (Lester del Rey's count) compared to 36 titles in 1953 1961 The British science fiction magazine implosion parallels the American collapse, with only "New Worlds" and "Science-Fantasy" still published, and only 18 total issues in 1961 Apr 1961 Anne McCaffrey's "The Ship Who Sang" in "F&SF" 1961: Seacon, the Nineteenth World Science Fiction Convention, in Seattle, Washington, (Hyatt House), Chaired by Wally Weber, Robert A. Heinlein as Guest of Honor, 300 members attending. The Hugo Award for Best Short Fiction went to : Brian Aldiss for his "Hothouse" series of stories. Finalists were: 1961 Lloyd Biggle's short story "Monument" 1961 Fritz Leiber's short story "Scylla's Daughter" 1961 Mack Reynolds' short story "Status Quo" 1961 James H. Schmitz' short story "Lion Loose" 1961 Avram Davidson's "The Sources of the Nile" in "F&SF", Richard Lupoff contends that this should have won the Hugo Award for best short story Dec 1961 Mack Reynolds' serial "Black Man's Burden" begins in "Analog" 1961 George Bamber's short story "Ottmar Balleau X 2" 1961 J. F. Bone's short story "A Prize for Edie" 1961 Reginald Bretnor's short story "All the Tea in China" 1961 Frederic Brown's short story "Nightmare in Time" 1961 David R. Bunch's short story "A Small Miracle of Fishhooks and Straight Pins" 1961 Lawrence Durrell's short story "High Barbary" 1961 Sheri S. Eberhart's short story "Extraterrestrial Trialogue in Terran Self-Destruction" 1961 George P. Elliott's short story "Among the Dangs" 1961 Alice Glaser's short story "The Tunnel Ahead" 1961 Julian F. Grow's short story "The Fastest Gun Dead" 1961 John Haase's short story "The Countdown" 1961 Robert B. Hale's short story "Immediately Yours" 1961 Kaatje Hurlbut's short story "A Passage From the Stars" 1961 Fritz Leiber's short story "The Beat Cluster" 1961 Anne McCaffrey's short story "The Ship Who Sang" 1961 Ward Moore's short story "It Becomes Necessary" 1961 Frederik Pohl & C. M. Kornbluth's short story "The Quaker Cannon" 1961 Kit Reed's short story "Judas Bomb" 1961 Mack Reynolds' short story "Freedom" 1961 David Rome's short story "Parky" 1961 Ray Russell's short story "The Long Night" 1961 Cordwainer Smith's short story "A Planet Named Shayol" 1961 Leo Szilard's short story "My Trial as a War Criminal" 1961 John Wyndham's short story "The Asteroids, 2194" 1961 Robert F. Young's short story "The Dandelion Girl" {the above 26 stories appear in Judith Merrill [editor] "Year's Best SF: 7th Annual Edition"} 1962 British magazine "Science Fiction Adventures" publishes six issues in 1962 June 1962 Theodore T. Thomas' "The Weatherman" in "Analog" 1962: Chicon II, the Twentieth World Science Fiction Convention, in Chicago, Illinois, (Pick-Congress Hotel), Chaired by Earl Kemp, Theodore Sturgeon as Guest of Honor, 568 members attending. Hugo Award for best SF Short Fiction went to Jack Vance for "The Dragon Master", and other nominees were: 1962 Gary Jenning's short story "Myrrha" 1962 Fritz Leiber's short story "The Unholy Grail" 1962 Theodore Sturgeon's short story "When You Care, When You Love" 1962 Thomas Burnett Swann's short story "Where is the Bird of Fire?" (Richard Lupoff contends that this should have won the Hugo Award for best short story) Sep 1962 Joseph Goodavage's astrology/weather prediction nonfiction series begins in "Analog" Nov 1962 H. Beam Piper's serial "Space Vikings" begins in "Analog" 1962 Vance Aandahl's short story "The Unfortunate Mr. Morky" 1962 Poul Anderson's short story "Kings Who Die" 1962 Arnold M. Auerbach's short story "The Day Rembrandt Went Public" 1962 Russell Baker's short story "Ms Found on a Bus" 1962 J. G. Ballard's short story "The Insane Ones" 1962 Ray Bradbury's short story "A Miracle of Rare Device" 1962 Frederic Brown's short story "Puppet Show" 1962 John Brunner's short story "Such Stuff" 1962 Brian Cleve's short story "Angela's Satyr" 1962 Mark Clifton's short story "Hang Head, Vandal" 1962 Gordon Dickson's short story "Home From the Shore" 1962 Harlan Ellison's short story "All the Sounds of Fear" 1962 Jack Finney's short story "The Face in the Photo" 1962 R. C. Fitzpatrick's short story "The Circuit Riders" 1962 Harry Harrison's short story "The Toy Shop" 1962 Karen Henderson's short story "The Piebald Hippogriff" 1962 Zenna Henderson's short story "Subcommittee" 1962 Gerald Kersh's short story "The Unsafe Deposit Box" 1962 R. A. Lafferty's short story "Seven-Day Terror" 1962 Fritz Leiber's short story "The Man Who Made Friends with Electricity" 1962 William F. Nolan's short story "One of Those Days" 1962 Frederik Pohl's short story "The Martian Star-Gazers" 1962 Bertrand Russell's short story "Planetary Effulgence" 1962 William Sambrot's short story "Leprechaun" 1962 Edward Wellen's short story "Deadly Game" 1962 James White's short story "Christmas Treason" 1962 George Whitley's short story "Change of Heart" {the above 27 stories appear in Judith Merrill [editor] "Year's Best SF: 8th Annual Edition"}
1963 Frederik Pohl ("Galaxy", "If") launches "Worlds of Tomorrow" 1963 Health Knowledge, Inc. publishes the "Magazine of Horror" under editor Robert A. W. Lowndes (until 1971) 1963 British magazine "Science Fiction Adventures" publishes three more issues in 1963 and then collapses 1963 The magazine "Quarber Mercur" is launched in Austria July 1963 Clifford D. Simak's serial "Here Gather the Stars" begins in "Galaxy" (later the book "Way Station") 1963: Discon I, the Twenty-First World Science Fiction Convention, in Washington, D.C, (Statler-Hilton Hotel), Chaired by George Scithers, Murray Leinster as Guest of Honor, 600 members attending. Hugo Awards and Nominations for Best SF Short Fiction were: 1963 Poul Anderson's short story "No Truce with Kings" (winner) 1963 Edgar Rice Burroughs' short story "Savage Pellucidar" (nominee) 1963 Rick Raphael's short story "Code Three" (nominee) 1963 Roger Zelazny's short story "A Rose for Ecclesiastes" (nominee) 1963 Philip K. Dick's "Stand-By" in "Amazing Stories", Richard Lupoff contends that this should have won the Hugo Award for best short story Nov 1963 Roger Zelazny heralded as a major star with publication of "A Rose for Ecclesiastes" in "F&SF" Dec 1963 Frank Herbert's serial "Dune World" begins in "Analog" (later published as the book "Dune") 1963 Charles Beaumont's short story "Mourning Song" 1963 Alfred Bester's short story "They Don't Make Life Like They Used To" 1963 Lloyd Biggle's short story "A Slight Case of Limbo" 1963 J. F. Bone's short story "On the Fourth Planet" 1963 Reginald Bretnor's short story "Mrs. Pigafetta Swims Well" 1963 Frederic Brown's short story "Double Standard" 1963 Hal Clement's short story "Hot Planet" 1963 Allen Danzig's short story "The Great Nebraska Sea" 1963 W. J. J. Gordon's short story "The Nobel Prize Winners" 1963 Frank A. Javor's short story "Interview" 1963 Gerald Kersh's short story "A Bargain with Cashel" 1963 Fritz Leiber's short story "237 Talking Statues" 1963 Bernard Malamud's short story "The JewBird" 1963 Bruce McAllister's short story "The Faces Outside" 1963 Andre Maurois' short story "The Earth Dwellers" 1963 Ray Nelson's short story "Eight O'Clock in the Morning" 1963 Cliff Owsley's short story "Confessions of the First Number" 1963 Peter Redgrove's short story "Mr. Waterman" 1963 Walt & Leigh Richmond's short story "Poppa Needs Shorts" 1963 Fred Saberhagen's short story "Fortress Ship" 1963 Cordwainer Smith's short story "Drunkboat" 1963 William Tenn's short story "Bernie the Faust" 1963 E. C. Tubb's short story "The Ming Vase" {the above 23 stories appear in Judith Merrill [editor] "Year's Best SF: 9th Annual Edition"}
1964 E. J. "Ted" Carnell forced out of British magazine "Science Fantasy", new editor is Kyril Bonfiglioli 1964 E. J. "Ted" Carnell forced out of British magazine "New Worlds", new editor is Michael Moorcock, who leads the revolutionary "New Wave" movement in science fiction 1964 The French magazine "Galaxie" is revived 1964: Pacificon II, the Twenty-Second World Science Fiction Convention, in Oakland, California, (Hotel Leamington), Chaired by J. Ben Stark and Al HaLevy, Leigh Brackett as Pro Guest of Honor, Edmond Hamilton as Pro Guest of Honor, Forrest J. Ackerman as Fan Guest of Honor, 523 members attending. Hugo Awards and Nominations for Best SF Short Fiction were: 1964 Gordon Dickson's short story "Soldier, Ask Not" (winner) 1964 Rick Raphael's short story "Once a Cop" (nominee) 1964 Albert F. Young's short story "Little Dog Gone" (nominee) 1964 Thomas M. Disch's "Now is Forever" in "Amazing Stories", Richard Lupoff contends that this should have won the Hugo Award for best short story Oct 1964 "If" under Frederik Pohl speeds up to monthly publication, having started as bimonthly Dec 1964 Larry Niven's "The Coldest Place" in "If" marks the debut of the top "Hard SF" author of his era 1964 Russell Baker's short story "A Sinister Metamorphosis" 1964 J. G. Ballard's short story "The Terminal Beach" 1964 Stephen Becker's short story "The New Encyclopaedist" 1964 John Brunner's short story "The Last Lonely Man" 1964 David R. Bunch's short story "Training Talk" 1964 Hap Carwood's short story "Synchromocracy" 1964 Arthur C. Clarke's short story "The Shining Ones" 1964 Thomas M. Disch's short story "Descending" the greatest escalator story ever told 1964 Larry Eisenberg's short story "The Pirokin Effect" 1964 James T. Farrell's short story "A Benefactor of Humanity" 1964 Romain Gary's short story "Decadence" 1964 Jose Maria Gironella's short story "The Red Egg" 1964 Donald Hall's shaggy dog story "The Wonderful Dog Suit" 1964 James D. Houston's short story "Gas Mask" 1964 Norman Kagan's short story "The Mathenauts" 1964 Morgan Kent's short story "Family Portrait" 1964 Fritz Leiber's short story "Be of Good Cheer" 1964 John D. MacDonald's short story "The Legend of Joe Lee" 1964 Joseph Nesvadba's short story "The Last Secret Weapon of the Third Reich" 1964 Arthur Porges' short story "Problem Child" 1964 Rick Raphael's short story "Sonny" 1964 Kit Read's short story "Automatic Tiger" 1964 Mack Reynolds' short story "Pacifist" 1964 Frank Roberts' short story "It Could Be You" 1964 Robert Rohrer's short story "The Man Who Found Proteus" 1964 Jack Sharkey's short story "The Twerlick" 1964 Isaac Bashevis Singer's short story "Yachid and Yechida" 1964 Philip H. Smith & Alan E. Nourse's short story "A Miracle Too Many" 1964 Robert Wallace's short story "A Living Doll" 1964 M. E. White's short story "The Power of Positive Thinking" 1964 Richard Wilson's short story "The Carson Effect" 1964 Roger Zelazny's short story "A Rose for Ecclesiastes" {the above 32 stories appear in Judith Merrill [editor] "Year's Best SF: 10th Annual Edition"} 1964 Christopher Anvil's short story "Bill for Delivery" 1964 Ben Bova and Myron L. Lewis' short story "Men of Good Will" 1964 John Brunner's short story "The Last Lonely Man" 1964 Philip K. Dick's short story "Oh, to Be a Blobel!" 1964 Thomas M. Disch's short story "Now is Forever" 1964 Colin Free's short story "The Weather in the Underworld" 1964 Edward Jesby's short story "Sea Wrack" 1964 Norman Kagan's short story "Four Brands of Impossible" 1964 Jack B. Lawson's short story "The Competitors" 1964 Fritz Leiber's short story "When the Change-Winds Blow" 1964 Robert Lory's short story "The Star Party" 1964 C. C. MacApp's short story "For Every Action" 1964 Edward Mackin's short story "The Unremembered" 1964 Harry Mulisch's short story "What Happened to Sergeant Masuro?" 1964 Joseph Nesvadba's short story "Vampires Ltd." 1964 Tom Purdom's short story "Greenplace" 1964 William F. Temple's short story "A Niche in Time" {the above 17 stories appear in Donald Wollheim and Terry Carr [editors] "World's Best Science Fiction: 1965"} It speaks well for the short fiction of 1964 that of the two fine anthologies listed above, only one story appears in both (John Brunner's "The Last Lonely Man"). Many people were writing many wonderful stories.
1965 Damon Knight founds Science Fiction Writers of America (SFWA) 1965 Ziff-Davis publishing, which had been printing "Amazing" and "Fantastic Stories" monthly, sells these magazines to Sol Cohen, a skelatonous former Robert Guinn employee who told your humble webmaster that he got into the magazine business because he loved the smell of pulp magazine paper/ink/glue. Sol Cohen cuts costs by slipping to bimonthly and mostly printing reprints, literally razored out of the priceless complete run of magazines in the "Amazing" library. Cele Goldsmith is no longer at the helm as editor. Ted White, who was hired by Cohen in 1969, told me that Cohen was "a scumbag." 1965 British magazine "Science Fantasy", under Kyril Bonfiglioli, accelerates from bimonthly to monthly Jan 1965 Frank Herbert's "Prophet of Dune" serial (sequel to "Dune") begins in "Analog" June 1965 E. E. Smith's "Skylark DuQuesne" begins in "Galaxy" 1965: Loncon II, the Twenty-Third World Science Fiction Convention, in London, England, (Mount Royal Hotel), Chaired by Ella Parker, Brian W. Aldiss as Guest of Honor, 350 members attending. Besides the Hugo Awards for Best Novel, listed in the section of this page about Books, the following Hugo Awards and Nominations were made for Best SF Short Fiction: 1965 Harlan Ellison's short story "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman" (winner) 1965 Poul Anderson's short story "Marque and Reprisal" (nominee) 1965 Philip Jose Farmer's short story "Day of the Great Shout" (nominee) 1965 Fritz Leiber's short story "Stardock" (nominee) 1965 Roger Zelazny's novelette "The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth" (nominee) 1965 Barrington Bayley's "All The King's Men" in "New Worlds", Richard Lupoff contends that this should have won the Hugo Award for best short story Oct 1965: Roger Zelazny's "... And Call Me Conrad" serial begins in "F&SF" (later a book from Ace as "This Immortal" Dec 1965 Robert Heinlein's "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" begins in "If" Dec 1965 Harlan Ellison's "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman" begins in "Galaxy", later won both Nebula and Hugo Awards 1965 Brian Aldiss' short story "Scarfe's World" 1965 Isaac Asimov's short story "Eyes Do More Than See" 1965 J. G. Ballard's short story "The Drowned Giant" 1965 J. G. Ballard's short story "The Volcano Dances" 1965 Donald Barthelme's short story "Game" 1965 Alistair Bevan's short story "Susan" 1965 Jorge Luis Borges' short story "The Circular Ruins" 1965 Art Buchwald's short story "Mars is Ours" 1965 David R. Bunch's short story "Investigating the Bidwell Endeavors" 1965 Johnny Byrne's short story "Yesterday's Gardens" 1965 Arthur C. Clarke's short story "Maelstrom II" 1965 Roald Dahl's short story "In The Ruins" 1965 Gordon R. Dickson's short story "Warrior" 1965 Thomas M. Disch's short story "The Roaches" 1965 Ron Goulart's short story "Terminal" 1965 Thomas Herzog's short story "The Plot" 1965 Harvey Jacobs' short story "The Girl Who Drew the Gods" 1965 Alfred Jarry's short story "Two Telepathic Letters to Lord Kelvin" 1965 A. K. Jorgensson's short story "Coming-of-Age Day" 1965 Gerald Kersh's short story "Somewhere Not Far From Here" 1965 Alex Kirs' short story "Better Than Ever" 1965 Bob Kurosaka's short story "Those Who Can, Do" 1965 R. A. Lafferty's short story "Slow Tuesday Night" 1965 Fritz Leiber's short story "Moon Duel" 1965 Alexander B. Malec's short story "Project Inhumane" 1965 David I. Masson's short story "Traveller's Rest" 1965 Walter Moudy's short story "The Survivor" 1965 Bob Ottum Jr.'s short story "Ado About Nothing" 1965 David Rome's short story "There's a Starman in Ward 7" 1965 Josephine Saxton's short story "The Wall" 1965 Robert Tilley's short story "Something Else" 1965 Robert D. Tschirigi's short story "A Singular Case of Extreme Electrolyte Balance Associated with Flie a Deux" 1965 E. C. Tubb's short story "J is for Jeanne" {the above 33 stories appear in Judith Merrill [editor] "Year's Best SF: 11th Annual Edition"} 1965 Christopher Anvil's short story "The Captive Djinn" 1965 Jonathan Brand's novelette "Vanishing Point" 1965 Lin Carter's short story "Uncollected Works" 1965 Arthur C. Clarke's short story "Sunjammer", a marvellous tale of a solar sail race which I edited for reprint in the anthology "Project Solar Sail" (Roc Books, 19xx) 1965 Harlan Ellison's short story "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman" 1965 Ron Goulart's short story "Calling Dr. Clockwork" 1965 Joseph Green's novelette "The Decision Makers" 1965 R. A. Lafferty's short story "In Our Block" 1965 Fritz Leiber's short story "The Good News Days" 1965 David I. Masson's short story "Traveller's Rest" 1965 Larry Niven's short story "Becalmed in Hell" 1965 Fred Saberhagen's novelette "The Masque of the Red Shift" 1965 James H. Schmitz's novelette "Planet of Forgetting" 1965 Clifford Simak's short story "Over the River and Through the Woods" 1965 Vernor Vinge's short story "Apartness" {the above 15 stories appear in Donald Wollheim and Terry Carr [editors] "World's Best Science Fiction: 1966"} Besides the Nebula Awards for Best Novel listed in the Books section of this web page, the following Nebula Awards and Nominations for short fiction were voted (in 1966) for these 1965 publications: Best SF Novella 1965 Brian Aldiss' "The Saliva Tree" (co-winner) 1965 Roger Zelazny's "He Who Shapes" (co-winner) 1965 Avram Davidson's "Rogue Dragon" (nominee) 1965 Samuel Delany's "The Ballad of Beta-2" (nominee) 1965 C. C. MacApp's "The Mercurymen" (nominee) 1965 Frederik Pohl's "Under Two Moons" (nominee) 1965 A. E. Van Vogt & James H. Schmitz's "Research Alpha" (nominee) Best SF Novelette 1965 Roger Zelazny's "The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth" (winner) 1965 James Blish and Norman Knight's "The Shipwrecked Hotel" (nominee) 1965 Jonathan Brand's "Vanishing Point" 1965 Thomas M. Disch's "102 H-Bombs" (nominee) 1965 R. C. Fitzpatrick's "Half a Loaf" (nominee) 1965 Joseph Green's "The Decision Makers" (nominee) 1965 Norman Kagan's "At the Institute" (nominee) 1965 Norman Kagan's "The Earth Merchant" (nominee) 1965 Norman Kagan's "Laugh Along with Franz" (nominee) 1965 Michael Karageorge's "The Life of Your Time" (nominee) 1965 Fritz Leiber's "Four Ghosts in Hamlet" (nominee) 1965 E. Clayton McCarty's "Small One" (nominee) 1965 Mack Reynolds' "Adventure of the Extraterrestrial" (nominee) 1965 Fred Saberhagen's "The Masque of the Red Shift" 1965 James H. Schmitz's "Goblin Nights" (nominee) 1965 James H. Schmitz's "Planet of Forgetting" 1965 James Schutz's "Maiden Voyage" (nominee) 1965 Robert Sheckley's "Shall We Have a Little Talk?" (nominee) 1965 William Tenn's "The Masculinist Revolt" (nominee) Best SF Short Story 1965 Harlan Ellison's "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman" (winner) [and there were 30 nominees]
1966 the bookazine anthology "Orbit" is launched by Damon Knight Summer 1966 Health Knowledge, Inc. publishes "Startling Mystery" under editor Robert A. W. Lowndes (until March 1971) 1966 The first Nebula Awards Banquet, held every year thereafter Besides the Nebula Awards for Best Novel listed in the Books section of this web page, the following Nebula Awards and Nominations for short fiction were voted (in 1967) for these 1966 publications: Best SF Novella 1966 Jack Vance's "The Last Castle" (winner) 1966 Avram Davidson's "Clash of Star Kings" (nominee) 1966 Charles L. Harness's "The Alchemist" (nominee) Best SF Novelette 1966 Gordon R. Dickson's "Call Him Lord" (winner) 1966 Robert M. Green, Jr.'s "Apology to Inky" (nominee) 1966 Charles L. Harness' "An Ornament to His Profession" (nominee) 1966 Hayden Howard's "The Eskimo Invasion" (nominee) 1966 Roger Zelazny's "The Moment of the Storm" (nominee) Best SF Short Story 1966 Richard McKenna's "The Secret Place" (winner) 1966 Brian Aldiss' "Man in His Time" (nominee) 1966 Bob Shaw's "Light of Other Days" (nominee) 1966 Health Knowledge, Inc. publishes the "Famous Science Fiction" under editor Robert A. W. Lowndes (until 1969) 1966: Tricon, the Twenty-Fourth World Science Fiction Convention, in Cleveland, Ohio, (Sheraton-Cleveland), Chaired by Ben Jason, L. Sprague de Camp as Guest of Honor, 850 members attending. Besides the Hugo Awards for Best Novel, listed in the section of this page about Books, the following Hugo Awards and Nominations were made for Best SF Novelette: 1966 Jack Vance's "The Last Castle" (winner) 1966 Gordon R. Dickson's "Call Him Lord" (nominee) 1966 Robert M. Green, Jr.'s "Apology to Inky" (nominee) 1966 Charles L. Harness's "The Alchemist" (nominee) 1966 Charles L. Harness' "An Ornament to His Profession" (nominee) 1966 Hayden Howard's "The Eskimo Invasion" (nominee) 1966 Thomas Burnett Swann's "The Manor of Rose" (nominee) 1966 Roger Zelazny's "For a Breath I Tarry" (nominee) 1966 Roger Zelazny's "The Moment of the Storm" (nominee) Best SF Short Story: 1966 Larry Niven's "The Neutron Star" (winner) 1966 Brian Aldiss' "Man in His Time" (nominee) 1966 Harlan Ellison's "Delusions for a Dragon Slayer" (nominee) 1966 Raymond F. Jones' "Rat race" (nominee) 1966 Richard McKenna's "The Secret Place" (nominee) 1966 Fred Saberhagen' "Mr. Jester" (nominee) 1966 Roger Zelazny's "Comes Now the Power" (nominee) 1966 Bob Shaw's "The Light of Other Days" in "Analog", Richard Lupoff contends that this should have won the Hugo Award for best short story 1966 Brian Aldiss' short story "Confluence" 1966 Dick Allen's short story "When I First Read" 1966 Hillary Bailey's short story "The Fall of Frenchy Steiner" 1966 J. G. Ballard's short story "The Cloud Sculptors of Coral D" 1966 J. G. Ballard's short story "You: Coma: Marilyn Monroe" 1966 Donald Barthelme's short story "The Balloon" 1966 William Burroughs' short story "They Do Not Always Remember" 1966 Hortense Calisher's short story "Journey from Ellipsia" 1966 Samuel Delany's short story "The Star Pit" 1966 Sonya Dorman's short story "When I Was Miss Dow" 1966 Carol Emshwiller's short story "Chicken Icarus" 1966 Charles L. Harness' short story "An Ornament to His Profession" 1966 Harvey Jacobs' short story "In Seclusion" 1966 R. A. Lafferty's short story "Narrow Valley" 1966 R. A. Lafferty's short story "The Primary Education of the Camiroi" 1966 Tommaso Landolfi's short story "Gogol's Wife" 1966 Fritz Leiber's short story "The Winter Flies" 1966 George MacBeth's short story "Crab-Apple Crisis" 1966 Katherine MacLean's short story "The Other" 1966 Henri Michaux's short story "And More Changes Still" 1966 Kit Reed's short story "The Food Farm" 1966 Bob Shaw's short story "The Light of Other Days" 1966 Peter Tate's short story "Beyond the Weeds" 1966 Gilbert Thomas' short story "Luana" 1966 John Updike's short story "During the Jurassic" {the above 25 stories appear in Judith Merrill [editor] "Year's Best SF: 12th Annual Edition"} 1966 Philip K. Dick's "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale" later adapted into the film Bladerunner (1982) 1966 Brian Aldiss' "Amen and Out" 1966 Paul Ash's "The Wing of a Bat" 1966 Avram Davidson's "Bumberboom" 1966 R. A. Lafferty's "Nine Hundred Grandmothers" 1966 Michael Moorcock's "Behold the Man" 1966 Diana Plachta's "The Man from When" 1966 Frederik Pohl's "Day Million" 1966 Bob Shaw's "Light of Other Days" 1966 A. A. Walde's "Bircher" 1966 Roger Zelazny's "For a Breath I Tarry" 1966 Roger Zelazny's "The Keys to December" {the above 12 stories appear in Donald Wollheim and Terry Carr [editors] "World's Best Science Fiction: 1967"}
1967 Ed Ferman, son of the Publisher, becomes editor of "F&SF" 1967 The French science fiction magazine "Horizons du Fantastique" is launched 1967: Nycon III, the Twenty-Fifth World Science Fiction Convention, in New York, (Statler-Hilton Hotel), Chaired by Ted White and Dave VanAmam, Lester del Rey as Pro Guest of Honor, Bob Tucker as Fan Guest of Honor, 1500 members attending. Besides the Hugo Award and noiminees for Best SF Novel (see the Major Books of the Year section), the short fiction Hugo Award winners and nominees were: Best SF Novella (first time for this category): 1967 Philip Jose Farmer's "Riders of the Purple Wage" (co-winner) 1967 Anne McCaffrey's "Weyr Search" (co-winner) 1967 Samuel R. Delany's "The Star-Pit" (nominee) 1967 Robert Silverberg's "Hawksbill Station" (nominee) 1967 Roger Zelazny's "Damnation Alley" (nominee) later adapted into the film Damnation Alley (19??) Best SF Novelette: 1967 Fritz Leiber's "Gonna Roll the Bones" (winner) 1967 Philip K. Dick's "Faith of Our Fathers" (nominee) 1967 Harlan Ellison's "Pretty Maggie Moneyeyes" (nominee) 1967 Andre Norton's "Wizard's World" (nominee) Best SF Short Story: 1967 Harlan Ellison's "I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream" (Winner) 1967 Samuel R. Delany's "Aye, and Gomorrah" (nominee) 1967 Larry Niven's "The Jigsaw Man" (nominee) 1967 Samuel R. Delany's "The Star Pit" in "Worlds of Tomorrow", Richard Lupoff contends that this should have won the Hugo Award Oct 1967 Anne McCaffrey's novelette "Weyr Search" in "Analog" Dec 1967 Anne McCaffrey's serial "Dragonrider" begins in "Analog", later combined with Weyr Search" as the Ballentine paperback of "Dragonrider" Dec 1967 Norman Spinrad's controversial "Bug Jack Baron" serial begins in "New Worlds" 1967 J. G. Ballard's Short Story "The Assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy Considered as a Downhill Motor Race" 1967 Ben Bova's Short Story "Fifteen Miles" 1967 A. Bertram Chandler's Short Story "The Left-Hand Way" 1967 Harlan Ellison's Short Story "Pretty Maggie Moneyeyes" 1967 Fred Hoyle's Short Story "Blackmail" 1967 Keith Laumer's Short Story "The Last Command" 1967 Fritz Leiber's Short Story "Answering Service" 1967 Kris Neville's Short Story "The Forest of Zil" 1967 Kit Reed's Short Story "The Vine" 1967 Frank M. Robinson's Short Story "The Wreck of the Ship 'John B'" 1967 C. C. Shackleton's Short Story "Ultimate Construction" 1967 Robert Silverberg's Short Story "Hawksbill Station" 1967 John T. Sladek's Short Story "1937 A.D.!" 1967 James Thurber's Short Story "Interview with a Lemming" 1967 Gray Wright's Short Story "Mirror of Ice" {the above 15 stories appeared in Harry Harrison & Brian Aldiss [editors] "Best SF: 1967" 1967 Brian Aldiss' Short Story "Full Sun" 1967 Isaac Asimov's Short Story "The Billiard Ball" 1967 D. G. Compton's Short Story "It's Smart to Have an English Address" 1967 Samuel R. Delany's Short Story "Driftglass" 1967 Thomas M. Disch's Short Story "The Number You Have Reached" 1967 Harlan Ellison's Short Story "I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream" 1967 Ron Goulart's Short Story "The Sword Swallower" 1967 Colin Kapp's Short Story "Ambassador at Verdammt" 1967 R. A. Lafferty's Short Story "The Man Who Never Was" 1967 R. A. Lafferty's Short Story "Thus We Frustrate Charlemagne" 1967 Larry Niven's Short Story "Handicap" 1967 Andrew J. Offutt's Short Story "Population Implosion" 1967 Keith Roberts' Short Story "Coranda" 1967 Robert Silverberg's Short Story "Hawksbill Station" 1967 Richard Wilson's Short Story "See Me Not" 1967 Roger Zelazny's Short Story "The Man Who Loved the Faioli" {the above 16 stories of 1967 appear in Donald Wollheim and Terry Carr [editors] "World's Best Science Fiction: 1968"} Besides the Nebula Awards for Best SF Novel, listed in the section above on Major Books of the Year, 1967 Nebula Awards and Nominees included: Best SF Novella (17,500-40,000 words): 1967 Michael Moorcock's "Behold the Man" (winner) 1967 Philip Jose Farmer's "Riders of the Purple Wage" (nominee) 1967 Ann McCaffrey's "Weyr Search" (nominee) 1967 Robert Silverberg's "Hawksbill Station" (nominee) 1967 Theodore Sturgeon's "If All Men were Brothers, Would You Let One Marry Your Sister" (nominee) Best SF Novelette (7,500-17,500 words): 1967 Fritz Leiber's "Gonna Roll the Bones" (winner) 1967 Harlan Ellison's "Pretty Maggie Moneyeyes" (nominee) 1967 Larry Niven's "Flatlander" (nominee) 1967 Roger Zelazny's "The Keys to December" (nominee) 1967 Roger Zelazny's "This Mortal Mountain" (nominee) Best SF Short Story (7,500 words or under): 1967 Samuel R. Delany's "Aye, And Gomorrah" (winner) 1967 Reginald Bretnor's "Earthwoman" (nominee) 1967 Samuel R. Delany's "Driftglass" (nominee) 1967 Fritz Leiber's "Answering Service" (nominee) 1967 Theodore Thomas' "The Doctor" (nominee) 1967 Kate Wilhelm's "Baby, You Were Great" (nominee)
1968 the Spanish magazine "Neuva Dimension" is launched 1968 the American journal "Locus" starts production 1968 Lester del Rey hired as Assistant Editor at "Galaxy" and its sister magazines (until 1969) Mar 1968 James Tiptree, Jr.'s "Birth of a Salesman" in "Analog" is the debut of this fine writer, later revealed to be a pseudonym of Alice Sheldon Apr 1968 Clifford D. Simak's serial "Goblin Reservation" begins in "Galaxy", unusual cross-genre science/magic novel starring William Shakespeare June 1968 "Galaxy" magazine under Frederik Pohl speeds up from bimonthly to monthly publication 1968: Baycon, the Twenty-Sixth World Science Fiction Convention, in Oakland, California, (Hotel Claremont), Chaired by Bill Donaho and Alva Rogers and J. Ben Stark, Philip Jose Farmer as Pro Guest of Honor, Walter J. Daughterty as Fan Guest of Honor, 1430 members attending. Besides the Hugo Awards for Best Novel, listed in the section of this page about Books, the following Hugo Awards and Nominations were made for Best SF Novella: 1968 Robert Silverberg's "Nightwings" (winner) 1968 Samuel R. Delany's "Lines of Power" (nominee) 1968 Anne McCaffrey's "Dragonrider" (nominee) 1968 Dean McLaughlin's "Hawk Among the Sparrows" (nominee) Best SF Novelette: 1968 Poul Anderson's "The Sharing of Flesh" (winner) 1968 Brian Aldiss' "Total Environment" (nominee) 1968 Piers Anthony's "Getting Through University" (nominee) 1968 Richard Wilson's "Mother to the World" (nominee) Best SF Short Story: 1968 Harlan Ellison's "The Beast that Shouted Love at the Heart of the World" (winner) 1968 Terry Carr's "The Dance of the Changer and the Three" (nominee) 1968 Betsy Curtis' "The Steiger Effect" (nominee) 1968 Damon Knight's "Masks" (nominee) 1968 Larry Niven's "All the Myriad Ways" (nominee) 1968 Joanna Russ's "The Barbarian" in "Orbit 3", Richard Lupoff contends that this should have won the Hugo Award for best short story Sep 1968 Robert Silverberg's "Nightwings" begins in "Galaxy" Besides the Nebula Awards for Best SF Novel, listed in the section above on Major Books of the Year, 1968 Nebula Awards and Nominees included: Best SF Novella (17,500-40,000 words): 1968 Ann McCaffrey's "Dragon Rider" (winner) 1968 Samuel R. Delany's "Lines of Power" (nominee) 1968 Keith Laumer's "The Day Beyond Forever" (nominee) 1968 Dean McLaughlin's "Hawk Among the Sparrows" (nominee) 1968 Robert Silverberg's "Nightwings" (nominee) Best SF Novelette (7,500-17,500 words): 1968 Richard Wilson's "Mother to the World" (winner) 1968 Brian Aldiss' "Total Environment" (nominee) 1968 Poul Anderson's "The Sharing of Flesh" (nominee) 1968 James Gunn's "The Listeners" (nominee) 1968 H. H. Hollis' "The Guerilla Trees" (nominee) 1968 Keith Laumer's "Once There Was a Giant" (nominee) Best SF Short Story (7,500 words or under): 1968 Kate Wilhelm's "The Planners" (winner) 1968 Poul Anderson's "Kyrie" (nominee) 1968 Terry Carr's "The Dance of the Changer and the Three" (nominee) 1968 H. H. Hollis' "Sword Game" (nominee) 1968 Damon Knight's "Masks" (nominee) 1968 Robert Taylor's "Idiot's Mate" (nominee) 1968 Isaac Asimov's Short Story "Segregationist" 1968 Roger Zelazny's Short Story "The Man Who Loved the Faioli" 1968 Stephen Goldin's Short Story "Sweet Dreams, Melissa" 1968 John D. MacDonald's Short Story "The Annex" 1968 David I. Masson's Short Story "Lost Ground" 1968 K. M. O'Donnell's Short Story "Final War" 1968 Kit Reed's Short Story "Golden Acres" 1968 Mack Reynolds' Short Story "Criminal in Utopia" 1968 Bob Shaw's Short Story "Appointment of Prila" 1968 Robert Sheckley's Short Story "Budget Planet" 1968 Robert Silverberg's Short Story "To the Dark Star" 1968 Theodore Sturgeon's Short Story "Like Young" {the above 12 stories appeared in Harry Harrison & Brian Aldiss [editors] "Best SF: 1968" 1968 Brian Aldiss' Short Story "Total Environment" 1968 Brian Aldiss' Short Story "The Worm that Flies" 1968 Poul Anderson's Short Story "Kyrie" 1968 Terry Carr's Short Story "The Dance of the Changer and the Three" 1968 Samuel R. Delany's "Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones" 1968 Burt Filer's Short Story "Backtracked" 1968 H. H. Hollis' Short Story "Sword Game" 1968 Colin Kapp's Short Story "The Cloudbuilders" 1968 Damon Knight's Short Story "Masks" 1968 R. A. Lafferty's Short Story "The Grand Carcass" 1968 Fritz Leiber's Short Story "The Square Root of Brain" 1968 Katherine MacLean's Short Story "Fear Hound" 1968 Fred Saberhagen's Short Story "Starsong" 1968 Robert Sheckley's Short Story "Street of Dreams, Feet of Clay" 1968 Sydney J. Van Scyoc's Short Story "A Visit to Cleveland General" 1968 Kurt Vonnegut's Short Story "Welcome to the Monkey House" 1968 Robert Silverberg's Short Story "Going Down Smooth" 1968 E. G. Von Wald's Short Story "Hemeac" 1968 Laurence Yep's Short Story "The Selchey Kids" {the above 19 stories of 1968 appear in Donald Wollheim and Terry Carr [editors] "World's Best Science Fiction: 1969"}
1969 Robert Guinn sells his chain of magazines to Universal Publishing and Distributing Company, which skips some issues of "Galaxy" and "If" and replaces Frederik Pohl with Ejler Jakobsson as Editor 1969 Sol Cohen, publisher of "Amazing" and "Fantastic" hires big-name fan Ted White as editor 1969 "Venture" magazine brefly revived. 1969 "Vision of Tomorrow", a British/Australian joint venture magazine, launched, has three issues in 1969; "Vision of Tomorrow" is the first to publish a story by Polish titan Stanislaw Lem July 1969 Frank Herbert's serial "Dune Messiah" starts in "Galaxy" 1969: St.Louiscon, the Twenty-Seventh World Science Fiction Convention, in St.Louis, Missouri (Chase-Park Plaza), Chaired by Ray Fisher and Joyce Fisher, Jack Gaughan as Pro Guest of Honor, Eddie Jones as TAFF, 1543 members attending. Besides the Hugo Awards for Best Novel, listed in the section of this page about Books, the following Hugo Awards and Nominations were made for Best SF Novella: 1969 Fritz Leiber's "Ship of Shadows" (winner) 1969 James Blish's "We All Die Naked" (nominee) 1969 Harlan Ellison's "A Boy and His Dog" (nominee) 1969 Anne McCaffrey's "Dramatic Mission" (nominee) 1969 Robert Silverberg's "To Jorslem" (nominee) Best SF Short Story: 1969 Samuel R. Delany's "Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones" (winner) 1969 Gregory Benford's "Deeper Than Darkness" (nominee) 1969 Ursula K. Le Guin's "Winter's King" (nominee) 1969 Larry Niven's "Not Long Before the End" (nominee) 1969 Robert Silverberg's "Passengers" (nominee) 1969 Robert Silverberg's "Sundance" in "F&SF", Richard Lupoff contends that this should have won the Hugo Award for best short story Besides the Nebula Awards for Best SF Novel, listed in the section above on Major Books of the Year, Nebula Awards and Nominees included: Best SF Novella (17,500-40,000 words): 1969 Harlan Ellison's "A Boy and His Dog" (winner) 1969 Charles L. Harness' "Probable Cause" (nominee) 1969 Fritz Leiber's "Ship of Shadows" (nominee) 1969 Ann McCaffrey's "Dramatic Mission" (nominee) 1969 Robert Silverberg's "To Jorslem" (nominee) Best SF Novelette (7,500-17,500 words): 1969 Samuel R. Delany's "Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones" (winner) 1969 Gregory Benford's "Deeper Than Darkness" (nominee) 1969 Ursula K. Le Guin's "Nine Lives" (nominee) 1969 Norman Spinrad's "The Big Flash" (nominee) Best SF Short Story (7,500 words or under): 1969 Robert Silverberg's "Passengers" (winner) 1969 Harlan Ellison's "Shattered Like a Glass Goblin" (nominee) 1969 Larry Niven's "Not Long Before the End" (nominee) 1969 Theodore Sturgeon's "The Man Who Loved Learning" (nominee) 1969 James Tiptree Jr.'s "The Last Flight of Dr. Ain" (nominee)
1970 "Galaxy" and "If", under Universal Publishing and Distributing Company, and Ejler Jakobsson, slip from monthly to bimonthly 1970 "Venture" magazine dies a second time 1970 "Vision of Tomorrow", a British/Australian joint venture magazine, collapses after three issues in 1969 and six in 1970 Apr 1970 British magazine "New Worlds", under Michael Moorcock, dies after being kept afloat by an Arts Council grant. Moorcock transforms the remnants into a remarkable book series. July 1970 Robert Heinlein's serial "I Will Fear No Evil" begins in "Galaxy" 1970: Heicon '70, the Twenty-Eighth World Science Fiction Convention, in Heidelberg, Germany (Heidelberg Stadthalle), Chaired by Manfred Kage, E. C. Tubb as UK Guest of Honor, Robert Silverberg as US Guest of Honor, Herbert W. Franke as German Guest of Honor, Elliot K. Shorter as Fan Guest of Honor, 620 members attending. John Brunner, as toastmaster, surprised his German and English-speaking fans alike by emceeing in flawless German. Besides the Hugo Awards for Best SF Novel, listed in the section above on Major Books of the Year, Hugo Awards and Nominees included: Best SF Novella: 1970 Fritz Leiber's "Ill met in Lankhmar" (winner) 1970 Harlan Ellison's "The Region Between" (nominee) 1970 Dean R. Koontz's "Beast Child" (nominee) 1970 Robert Silverberg's "The World Outside" (nominee) 1970 Clifford Simak's "The Thing in the Stone" (nominee) Best SF Short Story: 1970 Theodore Sturgeon's "Slow Sculpture" (winner) 1970 Ben Bova & Harlan Ellison's "Brillo" (nominee) 1970 Gordon Dickson's "Jean Dupres" (nominee) 1970 Keith Laumer's "In the Queue" (nominee) Besides the Nebula Awards for Best SF Novel, listed in the section above on Major Books of the Year, Nebula Awards and Nominees included: Best SF Novella (17,500-40,000 words): 1970 Fritz Leiber's "Ill met in Lankhmar" (winner) 1970 Poul Anderson's "Fatal Fulfillment" (nominee) 1970 Harlan Ellison's "The Region Between" (nominee) 1970 Clifford Simak's "The Thing in the Stone" (nominee) 1970 Kate Wilhelm's "April Fools' Day Forever" (nominee) Best SF Novelette (7,500-17,500 words): 1970 Theodore Sturgeon's "Slow Sculpture" (winner) 1970 Thomas M. Disch's "The Asian Shore" (nominee) 1970 Gordon Eklund's "Dear Aunt Annie" 1970 Gerald Jonas' "The Shaker Revival" (nominee) 1970 Harlan Ellison's "The Region Between" (nominee) 1970 R. A. Lafferty's novelette "Continued on Next Rock" (nominee) 1970 Joanna Russ' "The Second Inquisition" (nominee) Best SF Short Story (7,500 words or under): 1970 No Award (winner) 1970 Gardner Dozois' "A Dream at Noonday" (nominee) 1970 Harry Harrison's "By the Falls" (nominee) 1970 R. A. Lafferty's "Entire and Perfect Chrysolite" (nominee) 1970 Keith Laumer's "In the Queue" (nominee) 1970 James Sallis' "The Creation of Bennie Good" (nominee) 1970 Kate Wilhelm's "A Cold Dark Night with Snow" (nominee) 1970 Gene Wolfe's "The Island of Dr. Death" (nominee) Some of the best short fiction of the year 1970 included: 1970 Isaac Asimov's short story "Waterclap" 1970 Neil Barrett Jr.'s short story "Greyspun's Gift" 1970 Gregory Benford's short story "Nobody Lives of Burton Street" 1970 Michael Coney's short story "Whatever Became of the McGowans" 1970 Gordon Eklund's novelette "Dear Aunt Annie" 1970 Ron Goulart's short story "Confessions" 1970 H. B. Hickey's short story "Gone Are the Lupo" 1970 Gerald Jonas' novelette "The Shaker Revival" 1970 R. A. Lafferty's novelette "Continued on Next Rock" 1970 Larry Niven's short story "Bird in the Hand" 1970 Arthur Sellings' short story "The Last Time Around" 1970 Bob Shaw's short story "Invasion of Privacy" 1970 Robert Silverberg's short story "Ishmael in Love" 1970 Clifford Simak's novella "The Thing in the Stone" 1970 Theodore Sturgeon's novella "Slow Sculpture" {The above 15 stories may be found in Donald Wollheim & Terry Carr [editors] "World's Best Science Fiction 1971"} Return to Top of 1960s Timeline page
Hotlinks to other Timeline pages of SF Chronology |Introduction: Overview and Summary |Prehistory: Ancient Literary Precursors |Cosmic History:13 Billion BC to 3000 BC |6th Millennium BC: When the Goddess Ruled |5th Millennium BC: Mesopotamia, Egypt |4th Millennium BC: Iceman of the Alps, Old Kingdom Egypt |3rd Millennium BC: Gilgamesh and Cheops |2nd Millennium BC: Abraham to David |1st Millennium BC: Homer, Buddha, Confucius, Euclid |1st Century: Jesus, Cymbeline, Caligula, Pliny |2nd Century: Hero, Ptolemy, Nichomachus |3rd Century: 3 Kingdoms China, Legendary Japan |4th Century: Constantine, Hypatia, Ausonius |5th Century: Rome in Crisis, Dark Ages start |6th Century: Boethius, Taliesin, Mohammed |7th Century: Bede, Brahmagupta, Isidorus |8th Century: Beowulf, Charlemagne, 1001 Arabian Nights |9th Century: Gunpowder and the first printed book |10th Century: Arabs, Byzantium, China |11th Century: Khayyam, Gerbert, Alhazen |12th Century: Age of Translations |13th Century: Crusades, Kublai Khan, Universities |14th Century: Dante, Marco Polo, and Clocks |15th Century: Dawn of Scientific Revolution |16th Century: Ariosto and Cyrano on the Moon |17th Century: Literary Dawn |18th Century: Literary Expansion |19th Century: Victorian Explosion |1890-1910: Into Our Century |1910-1920: The Silver Age |1920-1930: The Golden Age |1930-1940: The Aluminum Age |1940-1950: The Plutonium Age |1950-1960: The Threshold of Space |1960-1970: The New Wave [you are HERE] |1970-1980: The Seventies |1980-1990: The Eighties |2000-2010: This Decade |2010-2020: Next Decade |Cosmic Future: Billions, Trllions, Googols Return to Top of 1960s Timeline page
Where to Go for More: 51 Useful Reference Books Beyond the World Wide Web... there is the library of old-fashioned books printed on paper. I strongly recommend that you start or follow-up your explorations of this web site by consulting any or all of these outstanding sources: ALDISS: "Billion Year Spree: The True History of Science Fiction", Brian W. Aldiss (New York: Doubleday, 1973; Schocken Paperback, 1974) ALLEN: "Science Fiction Reader's Guide", L. David Allen (Centennial Press, 1974) AMIS: "New Maps of Hell", Kingsley Amis (London: Gollancz, 1960; New York: Harcourt Brace, 1960) ASH1: "Who's Who in Science Fiction", by Brian Ash (Taplinger, 1976) ASH2: "The Visual Encyclopedia of Science Fiction", edited by Brian Ash (Harmony Books, 1977) ASHLEY: "The History of the Science Fiction Magazine" [3 volumes] (London: New English Library, 1974) ASIMOV "Asimov on Science Fiction" (New York: Avon, 1981) ATHELING: "The Issue at Hand", "William Atheling, Jr." [James Blish] (Chicago: Advent, 1964) BARRON: "Anatomy of Wonder", edited by Neil Barron (Bowker, 1976) BAXTER: "Science Fiction in the Cinema", John Baxter (London: A. Zwemmer, 1970; New York: A. S. Barnes, 1970) BERGONZI: "The Early H.G. Wells", Bernard Bergonzi (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1961) BLEILER: "The Checklist of Fantastic Literature" Everett F. Bleiler (Chicago: Shasta, 1948) BRETNOR1: "Modern Science Fiction: Its Meaning and Future", edited by Reginald Bretnor (New York: Coward-McCann, 1953) BRETNOR2: "The Craft of Science Fiction", Reginald Bretnor (New York: Harper & Row, 1977) BRINEY: "SF Bibliographies", Robert E. Briney & Edward Wood (Chicago: Advent, 1972) CLARESON1: "SF: The Other Side of Realism", edited by Thomas D. Clareson (Gregg Press, 1978) CLARESON2: "Extrapolation, 1959-1969", edited by Thomas D. Clareson (Bowling Green, Ohio: University Popular Press, 1971) CLARKE: "The Tale of the Future", I. F. Clarke (London: The Library Association, 1961, 1972) CONTENTO: "Index to the Science Fiction Anthologies and Collections", William Contento G.K. Hall, 1978) DAY: "Index to the Science Fiction Magazine: 1926-50", Donald B. Day (Portland, Oregon: Perri Press, 1952) DeCAMP: "Science Fiction Handbook", L. Sprague DeCamp (New York: Hermitage House, 1953) ELLIK: "The Universes of E. E. Smith", Ron Ellik & Bill Evans (Chicago: Advent, 1966) EVANS: "The Index of Science Fiction Magazines", Bill Evans with Jack Speer (Denver: Robert Peterson, 1946?) FRANKLIN: "Future Perfect: American Science Fiction of the Nineteenth Century", H. Bruce Franklin (New York: Oxford University Press, 1966) FREWIN: "One Hundred Years of Science Fiction Illustration", Anthony Frewin (London: Jupiter Books, 1974) GOODSTONE: "The Pulps", Tony Goodstone (New York: Chelsea House, 1970) GUNN: "Alternate Worlds", James Gunn (Englewood Cliffs NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1975) HARRISON: "John W. Campbell: Collected Editorials from Analog", Harry Harrison (Garden City NY: Doubleday, 1966) HOLMBERG: "Science Fiction History", John-Henri Holmberg (Vanersborg, Sweden: Askild & Karnekull, 1974) KNIGHT: "In Search of Wonder", Damon Knight (Chicago: Advent, 1956; enlarged 1967) KYLE: "A Pictorial History of Science Fiction", David Kyle (London: Hamlyn House, 1976) LOCKE: "Worlds Apart", edited by George Locke (London: Cornmarket Reprints, 1972) LUNDWALL: "Science Fiction: What It's All About", Sam J. Lundwall (New York: Ace Books, 1971) METCALF: "The Index of Science Fiction Magazines, 1951-1965", Norm Metcalf (J. Ben Stark, 1968) MILLIES: "Science Fiction Primer for Teachers", Suzanne Millies (Dayton OH: Pflaum, 1975) MOSKOWITZ#1: "The Immortal Storm", Sam Moskowitz (AFSO Press, 1954; Hyperion Press, 19??) MOSKOWITZ#2: "Explorers of the Infinite: Shapers of Science Fiction", Sam Moskowitz (Cleveland & New York: World, 1963) MOSKOWITZ#3: "Seekers of Tomorrow", Sam Moskowitz (Cleveland & New York: World, 1963) NESFA: "Index to the Science Fiction Magazines", New England Science Fiction Association (Cambridge MA: NESFA, 1971) PERRY: "The Penguin Book of Comics", George Perry & Alan Aldridge (London: Penguin, 1971) ROGERS: "A Requiem for Astounding", Alva Rogers (Chicago: Advent, 1964) ROTTSTEINER: "The Science Fiction Book", Franz Rottsteiner (London: Thames & Hudson, 1975) SADOUL: "Hier, L'An 2000 [Illustrations from the Golden Age of Science Fiction]", Jaxques Sadoul (Paris: Editions Denoel, 1973) STRAUSS: "The MIT Science Fiction Society's Index to the SF Magazines: 1951-64" Erwin S. Strauss (Cambridge MA: MIT Science Fiction Society, 1966) TUCK: "The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy, 2nd Edition", Donald H. Tuck (Hobart, Tasmania: Donald H. Tuck, 1959) VERSINS: "Encyclopedie des l'utopie, des voyages extraordinaires et de la science fiction", (Lausanne: L'Age d'Homme, 1972) WAGGONER: "The Hills of Faraway", Diana Waggoner (Athenaeum, 1978) WARNER: "All Our Yesterdays", Harry Warner, Jr. (Chicago: Advent, 1969) WELLS: "Fictional Accounts of Trips to the Moon", Lester G. Wells (Syracuse NY: Syracuse University Library, 1962) WILLIAMSON: "H.G. Wells: Critic of Progress", Jack Williamson (Baltimore: Mirage Press, 1973) WOLLHEIM: "The Universe Makers", Donald A. Wollheim (New York: Harper & Row, 1971) Return to Top of 1960s Timeline page

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